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rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species
by Nadia Drake
The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”
It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.
Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.
They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…
(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)
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rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species
by Nadia Drake
The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”
It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.
Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.
They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…
(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)
Zoom Info
rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species
by Nadia Drake
The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”
It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.
Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.
They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…
(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)
Zoom Info
rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species
by Nadia Drake
The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”
It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.
Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.
They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…
(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)
Zoom Info

rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species

by Nadia Drake

The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”

It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.

Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.

They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…

(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)

shoplarkabout:

Thirteen year old Ashol-Pan and her golden eagle. From BBC News:

The Kazakhs of the Altai mountain range in western Mongolia are the only people that hunt with golden eagles, and today there are around 400 practising falconers. Ashol-Pan, the daughter of a particularly celebrated hunter, may well be the country’s only apprentice huntress.


Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.
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Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.
[x] [x] [x] [x] [x]
Zoom Info

Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.
[x] [x] [x] [x] [x]
Zoom Info

Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.
[x] [x] [x] [x] [x]
Zoom Info

Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.
[x] [x] [x] [x] [x]
Zoom Info

Bateleur eagles, Terathopius ecaudatus, are generally the most recognised serpent eagle. Compared to other raptors, the eagles fly a massive range in search for food; individuals have been noted to fly up to 300 miles (500km) in a short period of time. It can take individuals up to eight years to fully moult their speckled brown feathers for their recognisable black and grey adult plumage. The species also has a very short tail compared to other birds, meaning they can walk in all directions without damaging their tail feathers. This is especially useful when hunting for small rodents or snakes which can easily scan the skies for predators. Bateleurs’ are opportunistic feeders; they will eat carrion they come across whether it be mammal, bird, reptile or fish, and will resort to hunting effectively if there is no food available. The species often spends a large deal of its time sunbathing, as the dark coloured plumage can rapidly gather heat. This can also aid the bird in hunting snakes with heat pits; the snake will generally strike for the hottest part of the animal, so an approaching Bateleur with outstretched wings is unlikely to be struck by the snake; it will often attempt to bite the heated wings instead of the body which is an effective defence for the bird against venomous prey.

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(Source: huntersonthewing)

elinaynature:

This is a Passage Female Red-Tailed Hawk Slope Soaring thermals off cliffs in the desert winds. She loved this style of flight, she would simply hover above waiting for a rabbit to kick up in the brush below. 
Red-Tailed Hawks are very versatile birds and can be hunted in many ways to fit your quarry and environment.

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